Bad Boy Harvey Norman Salesman Eyeing Up New Gig At JB HI-FI After Getting Hectic Forearm Tattoo — The Betoota Advocate

Bad Boy Harvey Norman Salesman Eyeing Up New Gig At JB HI-FI After Getting Hectic Forearm Tattoo — The Betoota Advocate

WENDELL HUSSEY | Cadet | Contact

A rebellious TV sales specialist is believed to be updating his resume this week, as he weighs up the opportunity to join the dark side.

After spending the last two years slinging home appliances and whitegoods at the flagship Harvey Norman located in the Betoota Heights supacentre, local man Sean Howarth is understood to be thinking about throwing his tie in, and working at a store that accepts his alternative lifestyle. 

A retail specialist with over 24 months of interest-free experience in the art of selling plasma screen TVs, Sean is reportedly considering taking his transferable skill set to his companies biggest rivals, JB Hi-Fi.

Sporting a fresh new Sailor Jerry’s style tattoo of a prowling jaguar, Sean told The Advocate his recent heel turn hasn’t been embraced by senior management.

“After rewatching Vikings this week, I decided life’s too short to be a clean skin and I got finally got around to getting some ink,” Sean told our reporter as he pumped a cigarette in the loading dock.

“But management really aren’t happy about it, they’ve asked me to roll down my sleeves and keep it covered like I’m some kind of sinner.”

Following two years of wearing dress pants and an ironed shirt to work, Sean told The Advocate he was excited to embrace a more casual retail lifestyle, one where he can rock a SlipKnot shirt and some Vans to work.

“I feel like a caged animal here, everything’s so stuffy and formal.”

“Tuck your shirt in, polish your shoes, God they make us dress up like Mormans to sell toasters and the odd smoothie maker.”

“I’ve made friends with the delivery guy at JB and he reckons he can text my resume to his boss, I can’t wait to burn this name tag and take on something more chill ya know!”

More to come.

Author: Stephen Bailey